Impressions

There is an exhibit on at the National Gallery: Inventing the Impressionists. It tells the story of Paul Durand – Ruel, the French art dealer who brought and displayed, marketed and sold early Impressionist pieces of art, whilst they were still being ridiculed, and supported the artists, both financially and in other ways, whilst the rest of the world laughed at them.

Now, however, it is they who are laughing as the rest of the world stand in awe at the beauty and creativity of each picture. The Impressionists emerged with photography; whereas art had previously been about capturing a life like image of a place or person, people now had cameras and art became much less about the details and much more about the use of colour and light and the artists own… Well, impression.

These artists include Monet, Manet, Degas, Renoir, Cézanne and Pissarro. Masters, artists, talented, inspiration. People who are now revered and admired and heralded as the greats. But these people fought against the most tremendous odds to become the greats; people would laugh at their modern approach and critics would insult their work. And yet they fought. And succeeded. Because it might be a struggle, but we can fight to become anything we want to be.

One feature of Impressionist art is the small but visible brushstrokes that make up the painting. If you were to look at just a small section of the canvas, you would only see blobs of paint and small lines from the paintbrush. But when you step back and look at the entire painting, it becomes something beautiful; a landscape or a garden or a person or some flowers.

It is was to get bogged down by life and the small, mundane problems and details that weave the fabric of our very existence. And when we do something, like smile at someone or say thank you, it might seem like a small or insignificant dabble of paint on the canvas. But when we step back or look back, we might realise that our ‘insignificant’ deed was the final stroke of the brush, the one that completed the painting. We have no idea of the power our actions have. So we have to ensure that we are always adding something to the overall painting, not detracting from its breathtaking beauty.

There is an exhibit on at the National Gallery: Inventing the Impressionists. It tells the story of Paul Durand – Ruel, the French art dealer who brought and displayed, marketed and sold early Impressionist pieces of art, whilst they were still being ridiculed, and supported the artists, both financially and in other ways, whilst the rest of the world laughed at them.

Now, however, it is they who are laughing as the rest of the world stand in awe at the beauty and creativity of each picture. The Impressionists emerged with photography; whereas art had previously been about capturing a life like image of a place or person, people now had cameras and art became much less about the details and much more about the use of colour and light and the artists own… Well, impression.

These artists include Monet, Manet, Degas, Renoir, Cézanne and Pissarro. Masters, artists, talented, inspiration. People who are now revered and admired and heralded as the greats. But these people fought against the most tremendous odds to become the greats; people would laugh at their modern approach and critics would insult their work. And yet they fought. And succeeded. Because it might be a struggle, but we can fight to become anything we want to be.

One feature of Impressionist art is the small but visible brushstrokes that make up the painting. If you were to look at just a small section of the canvas, you would only see blobs of paint and small lines from the paintbrush. But when you step back and look at the entire painting, it becomes something beautiful; a landscape or a garden or a person or some flowers.

It is was to get bogged down by life and the small, mundane problems and details that weave the fabric of our very existence. And when we do something, like smile at someone or say thank you, it might seem like a small or insignificant dabble of paint on the canvas. But when we step back or look back, we might realise that our ‘insignificant’ deed was the final stroke of the brush, the one that completed the painting. We have no idea of the power our actions have. So we have to ensure that we are always adding something to the overall painting, not detracting from its breathtaking beauty.

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